Resources for Fashion Designers Looking for Ethical Sourcing…even small runs!

See also the blog titled: VIDA is passionate about helping to drive social change for artists and makers

A visual summary first, and then live links below!Becasue We Care Blog DESIGNER-Postcards

Services in Creating Ethical Fashion, Especially Those Paying Living Wages:

  1. Go LOCAL – and even your friends! (How cool would it be if we started supporting each other not just with words but with our business!) If you need garments sewn or hemmed, etc, ask around if any of your friends have this skill (not something people tend to brad about, so it may be a secret! Some fashion designers are willing to work on other’s projects as a way to earn a little money. Or check out your own Local First site. In Phoenix, AZ it is at http://www.localfirstaz.com
  2. Fair Wear Factory Guide – Fair Wear Foundation has launched the Factory Guide, a new online training tool developed with the support of the Swiss NGO Brot für alle. https://www.fairwear.org/featured/
  3. GOEX — the brand that cares for kids. All full-time GOEX employees make more than 2x the local minimum wage.Your GOEX t-shirts employ skilled apparel makers who cut and sew premium USA fabric at our production facility in Haiti. Your purchase also supports employees at our print shop and distribution center in the heart of Kansas City. Get a quote o custom t-shirts. https://groupapparel.goex.org/design-custom-tees

Providing an Array of Services for Designers:

1. Arizona Fashion Source: Arizona Fashion Source is a no-minimum, full service, fashion and apparel manufacturer.   http://www.azfashionsource.com
2. Nineteenth Amendment: Design feedback and tech pack builder, direct to consumer sales, access pre-vetted, low minimum, domestic cut-and-sew manufacturers to bid on your projects and more.  https://www.nineteenthamendment.com/become-a-designer
3. Source My Garment:
Apparel Production Services: Review and Assessment, Factory Selection and Sourcing, Counter and First Sample Development, Fabric Development, etc.
http://sourcemygarment.com/
4. CO (Common Objective). Still in the launching phase. Sign up for updates! “Learn. Connect. Collaborate.Get matched with people and resourcesthat will help you succeed.Without compromise.”
https://www.commonobjective.co/

Ethical Fabric Sourcing:

8. BCI (Better Cotton Initiative): “The Better Cotton Initiative exists to make global cotton production better for the people who produce it, better for the environment it grows in and better for the sector’s future. BCI aims to transform cotton production worldwide by developing Better Cotton as a sustainable mainstream commodity.
To achieve this mission, BCI works with a diverse range of stakeholders across the cotton supply chain to promote measurable and continuing improvements for the environment, farming communities and the economies of cotton-producing areas.” http://bettercotton.org/
9. thread – Responsible fabric from Ground to Good:  “The stuff we buy should be as good for the people who make it as it is for those who buy it.” Responsible fabric from Ground to Good. Job provision, clean up trash, recycle plastics into fabric. Supporting people and communities in Haiti and Honduras…and more http://www.threadinternational.com/
10. CMiA (Cotton Made in Africa): Sub-Saharan Africa is the fifth largest cotton exporter worldwide. Cotton is grown there by about 3.4 million smallholder farmers. A total of more than 20 million people in the region are directly or indirectly living from cotton. Cotton thus plays a key role in fighting poverty and makes a major contribution to food security in many countries of sub-Saharan Africa. So far, African smallholder farmers have not been fully able to use this potential to improve their economic living conditions, as they are faced with many challenges such as fluctuating world market prices, low productivity, and poor infrastructure. Against this background, the Cotton made in Africa initiative has set itself the goal since 2005 to sustainably improve the living conditions of cotton farmers in Sub-Saharan Africa. Our commitment is thus not based on donations, but rather, on the principle of helping people to help themselves through trade.
http://www.cottonmadeinafrica.org/en/

 

 

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